Next workshop:
  1. 2017-04-02-OOA-0737web2
    Out of Africa Wildlife Park
    November 20, 2021 @ 6:00 am - 3:30 pm
  2. Photographer: Kathleen Reeder
    Canada Snowy Owls
    January 16, 2022 - January 21, 2022
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Category : Photography Tips

04 Aug 2017
Andrea Sobotka

Andrea Sobotka Shares Her Insights About Capturing the Spirit of Animals

What could an Animal Communicator and Holistic Energy Healer have in common with a Wildlife Photographer? Most importantly, a passion and love for wildlife. I have been following Kathleen Reeder’s wonderful wildlife photography for several years now. Until recently, we had not met in person but were connected through Facebook and have both held workshops at Out Of Africa Wildlife Park on our respective subjects. I could see through her beautiful images that we both share an immense passion for…

08 Jul 2017
Pine Marten Photo by Kathleen Reeder

Spring Babies 2017 Trip Report

With the Rocky Mountains in view every day, photographing the Triple D animals in Kalispell, Montana is always an enjoyable experience. Add adorable beautiful wildlife babies to the scene and it doesn’t get any better! This years Springtime Babies Photo Workshop included coyote pups, a mountain lion cub, a pine marten baby, raccoon kits, red fox kits, a Siberian Lynx kitten and striped skunk kits, plus a great variety of wildlife adults. Check out the photos below to see the amazing babies.…

07 May 2017

Frequently Asked Questions about Attending a Photo Workshop

Besides the incredible photos you capture, photo workshops are an excellent way to increase your photography skills in a short period of time. This article answers three commonly asked questions about attending a photo workshop: what should you bring, what camera settings should you be familiar with and what should you practice before attending. What Should You Bring to a Photo Workshop? DSLR camera or equivalent. There are sophisticated all-in-one cameras with super zoom capabilities that will work perfectly fine too.…

27 Dec 2016

The Little Lions and Crocodile

In a split second, a potentially great wildlife photo is here and gone, forever. That’s why I suggest shooting in burst or continuous high release mode when there is a possibility of fast action. With continuous high release, when you press and hold down on the shutter-release button, the camera will take the maximum number of photos possible until the memory buffer is full or you lift your finger. The benefit is you have a sequence of the action shots…

01 Dec 2016

Ron Hayes asks What’s On Your Mind?

Just over eight years ago I was fortunate to make the acquaintance of a photographer by the name of John Timmis. John is not one of the “big names” but he likely should be. He is a regular contributor to Outdoor Life and Field and Stream magazines, his images adorning multiple covers. He is also a videographer; much of his work has been featured on PBS Natural World documentaries. John is a New Yorker, he is extremely verbose and there…

10 May 2016

Where not to crop

We don’t always have the opportunity to include the entire body of the subject in the photo. It’s perfectly acceptable to crop the photo. Simply avoid cropping the subject at a joint, as illustrated in the photos below.

10 Dec 2015

Taking Photos in Snowy Conditions

Getting a good exposure in snowy conditions can be a little tricky. Does the snow look gray in your photos? This tip explains why this happens and what to do about it. Camera meters are designed to give exposure readings perceptually in the middle between white and black, a middle- tone value. When your scene is mostly snow, the camera meter gives a reading that brings the tonality back to neutral gray, which causes the image to be underexposed. In…

10 Dec 2015

Demystify Depth of Field

Depth of Field is how much of a given photograph is in sharp focus from the foreground of what’s in your frame to the background. Only what your focus point is on (shown as a square or dot when you look through the view finder) will be razor sharp. Other elements in front of (closer to you) and behind (further away from you) will be somewhat sharp. A “shallow” depth of field means a limited part of the photo is…

09 Sep 2014

How To Make A Fence Disappear

Is there a fence in your way? No problem! Use these camera settings to make the fence disappear in your photograph. Use the longest focal length of your telephoto lens. If you are able to put the lens within an inch or two from the fence, a 100mm focal length will work. The farther away you are from the fence, the longer the focal length you will need to make the fence disappear. Generally, if you are a few feet…

09 Jun 2014

Camera Settings Checklist

Check the settings each time you use your camera. Use this 10-step checklist to be ready when a wildlife photo opportunity presents itself. Set Exposure Mode: Choose Aperture Priority (A or AV) to control depth of field. Choose Shutter Priority (S or TV) to blur/freeze movement. Choose Manual to control both. Set Aperture f-stop (In Aperture Priority or Manual): f/4 – f/7 will soften or blur the background and enable faster shutter speeds. Set Shutter Speed (In Shutter Priority or…